Di Cavalcanti

In the early twentieth century the pervasive influence of modernist art pioneers, such as Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse, was a cause of inspiration and conflict for the artist Emiliano di Cavalcanti, who above all wished to nurture a Brazilian art scene free of outside influences.

...........................................................................................................................................

Di Cavalcanti began his career as an artist through illustrations and designs he created for local publications but went on to become a prolific painter of canvases and murals by the end of his life.

...........................................................................................................................................

Di Cavalcanti
Due to a childhood spend among artistic family and friends and recognized Brazilian intellectuals
di Cavalcanti was spurred onto contributing designs for money from an early age, such as for the magazine Fon-Fon. Despite this evident inclination towards the arts he went on to study at the Faculty of Law at Largo de Sao Francisco in Rio de Janeiro, but continued doing illustrations until he began to paint.

...........................................................................................................................................

Subsequently he started attending the studio of impressionist George Fisher Elpons and became friends with Mario de Andrade and Oswald de Andrade(no relation)—renowned Brazilian poets, intellectuals and critics. In 1922 di Cavalcanti became immersed in the organization of Brazil’s first Week of Modern Art held in the Municipal Theatre of São Paulo, his responsibilities included the creation of the events merchandise and marketing artwork.

...........................................................................................................................................

Political turbulence in Brazil at the time had a growing influence on di Cavalcanti, who cut his trip to Paris in the mid-1920s short in order to return to Brazil following the 1924 revolution. But despite the relative brevity di Cavalcanti’s trip to Paris had a lasting impression on his mind and on his art.

...........................................................................................................................................

After returning to Brazil in 1926, and joining the opposition Communist Party di Cavalcanti travelled once more to Paris—ostensibly due to political persecution back home but also because of his strong creative ties to the world’s art capital. There he created the panels that now decorate the magnificent Teatro João Caetano in Rio de Janeiro, as well as a number of other works that miraculously survived the Nazi occupation of Paris to be found in the basement of the Brazilian embassy in 1946.

...........................................................................................................................................

The political upheaval of the 1930s, both in Europe and Brazil, caused di Cavalcanti to question much of the framework upholding his life, including societal norms in Brazil and the nature of man as a political animal versus a free human being.

...........................................................................................................................................

Di CavalcanteDuring his time in Paris and upon his return to Brazil shortly before the outbreak of WWII, di Cavalcanti participated in many collective works held at national and international salons—much of this work from this period draws on the feelings of imprisonment, political exile, and the yearning for a more harmonious connection between the Brazilian peoples.

...........................................................................................................................................

He illustrated books of Vinicius de Morais and Jorge Amado and in 1954 the Museum of Modern Art in Rio de Janeiro held a retrospective exhibition of his works. He also received a proposal from the great Oscar Niemeyer to create the images for a tapestry to be installed in the Palácio da Alvorada, for the astonishing project of Brasilia.

...........................................................................................................................................

Di Cavalcanti was also responsible for the murals that cover the walls of the Via Crucis of the cathedral of Brasilia. The overriding symbol of di Cavalcanti’s work is the female mulatto, neither black nor white he believed the mulatta was the true representation of Brazil and its conflicted history. The tropical sensuality of his country was to be treasured and projected into its art, not trampled upon underneath the legacy of European themes.

...........................................................................................................................................

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Di Cavalcanti

In the early twentieth century the pervasive influence of modernist art pioneers, such as Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse, was a cause of inspiration and conflict for the artist Emiliano di Cavalcanti, who above all wished to nurture a Brazilian art scene free of outside influences.

...........................................................................................................................................

Di Cavalcanti began his career as an artist through illustrations and designs he created for local publications but went on to become a prolific painter of canvases and murals by the end of his life.

...........................................................................................................................................

Di Cavalcanti
Due to a childhood spend among artistic family and friends and recognized Brazilian intellectuals
di Cavalcanti was spurred onto contributing designs for money from an early age, such as for the magazine Fon-Fon. Despite this evident inclination towards the arts he went on to study at the Faculty of Law at Largo de Sao Francisco in Rio de Janeiro, but continued doing illustrations until he began to paint.

...........................................................................................................................................

Subsequently he started attending the studio of impressionist George Fisher Elpons and became friends with Mario de Andrade and Oswald de Andrade(no relation)—renowned Brazilian poets, intellectuals and critics. In 1922 di Cavalcanti became immersed in the organization of Brazil’s first Week of Modern Art held in the Municipal Theatre of São Paulo, his responsibilities included the creation of the events merchandise and marketing artwork.

...........................................................................................................................................

Political turbulence in Brazil at the time had a growing influence on di Cavalcanti, who cut his trip to Paris in the mid-1920s short in order to return to Brazil following the 1924 revolution. But despite the relative brevity di Cavalcanti’s trip to Paris had a lasting impression on his mind and on his art.

...........................................................................................................................................

After returning to Brazil in 1926, and joining the opposition Communist Party di Cavalcanti travelled once more to Paris—ostensibly due to political persecution back home but also because of his strong creative ties to the world’s art capital. There he created the panels that now decorate the magnificent Teatro João Caetano in Rio de Janeiro, as well as a number of other works that miraculously survived the Nazi occupation of Paris to be found in the basement of the Brazilian embassy in 1946.

...........................................................................................................................................

The political upheaval of the 1930s, both in Europe and Brazil, caused di Cavalcanti to question much of the framework upholding his life, including societal norms in Brazil and the nature of man as a political animal versus a free human being.

...........................................................................................................................................

Di CavalcanteDuring his time in Paris and upon his return to Brazil shortly before the outbreak of WWII, di Cavalcanti participated in many collective works held at national and international salons—much of this work from this period draws on the feelings of imprisonment, political exile, and the yearning for a more harmonious connection between the Brazilian peoples.

...........................................................................................................................................

He illustrated books of Vinicius de Morais and Jorge Amado and in 1954 the Museum of Modern Art in Rio de Janeiro held a retrospective exhibition of his works. He also received a proposal from the great Oscar Niemeyer to create the images for a tapestry to be installed in the Palácio da Alvorada, for the astonishing project of Brasilia.

...........................................................................................................................................

Di Cavalcanti was also responsible for the murals that cover the walls of the Via Crucis of the cathedral of Brasilia. The overriding symbol of di Cavalcanti’s work is the female mulatto, neither black nor white he believed the mulatta was the true representation of Brazil and its conflicted history. The tropical sensuality of his country was to be treasured and projected into its art, not trampled upon underneath the legacy of European themes.

...........................................................................................................................................

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