Brazilian Literature

While Paulo Coelho is Brazil's best-selling writer, and indeed the most successful author of all time in the Portuguese language, Brazil presents a breadth and depth of gargantuan proportions in the literary world.

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Jorge Amado
While Salvador's Jorge Amado is generally regarded as Brazil's most famous writer, Carioca (Rio de Janeiro resident) Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, the son of a freed slave, is generally regarded as Brazil's greatest writer.

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=> And during Brazil's two decade military dictatorship, Brazilian writers became much more overtly political in their themes.

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Coelho, Amado, Machado de Assis, Garcia-Roza, Brandao
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Machado de Assis

Paulo Coelho, whose books have sold more than 100 million copies, is a Brazilian icon who typically deals with New Age and spiritual themes. However there is a whole world of other Brazilian literature to be explored. Jorge Amado, whose career spanned most of the twentieth century, writes lively and colorful romances of Bahia and its people.
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=> Machado de Assis has been described as writing with an acute and cutting cynicism, both in fiction and journalist work.
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Check out The Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas or Quincas Borba. Luis Alfredo Garcia-Roza, meanwhile, has made a name for himself for gritty crime novels which mostly deal with his Copacabana neighborhood. If you're interested in the rebellion and revolution of the military dictatorship, look no further than Ignacio de Loyola Brandao's Zero, which was originally banned by the government. The ban was only rescinded following a national protest against the government. And, more recently, Aluisio Azevedo has made a name for himself for his gripping and compelling accounts of life in Brazil's favelas.

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