Cândido Portinari

Cândido Portinari was one of the major Brazilian artists, with great international fame. He painted nearly five thousand works of art, from small paintings to gigantic murals like War and Peace, which were donated to the UN headquarters in New York.

..........................................................................................................................................

Cândido Portinari
The son of Italian immigrants
, Cândido Portinari was raised on a farm in the interior of São Paulo and despite a poor education and not completing primary school, discovered he had a blossoming talent as an artist from a very young age. At the age of 14 he was recruited as an assistant by a troupe of painters and sculptors who were passing through his town. At the age of 15 he moved to Rio de Janeiro to study at the National School of Fine Arts, where he drew the attention of teachers and the press.

..........................................................................................................................................

At the age of 20 he participated in several art exhibitions. It was at this moment in his eventful life that he first became interested in modernism, then considered an outside movement. After painting a canvas within the traditional academic standards, Portinari won a highly-desired gold medal from the National School of Fine Arts as well as a trip to Europe.

..........................................................................................................................................

This trip to Europe was to prove a decisive period for the young artist—there he lived in Paris for two years where he formed relationships with other important artists such as Maria Martinelli, a 19-year-old Uruguayan with whom he spent the rest of his life.

..........................................................................................................................................

During his time in Paris Portinari never forgot about Brazil. Looking back the artist has often remarked that the physical distance actually caused him to grow more involved in the social struggles of his country. In 1931 he returned home a changed man with a changed perspective on his own artistic aesthetics.

.........................................................................................................................................

Cândido PortinariHe left aside the oil canvases to concentrate on painting murals and frescoes.These murals and frescoes caused a furor in the Brazilian art scene and led to his growing fame. Three of these paintings were exhibited at the Brazilian Pavilion at the New York World's Fair in 1939. In the 1940s, the general director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York (MoMA), Alfred Barr, bought Portinaris’ canvas "Morro do Rio" and exhibited him alongside already well-established artists.

..........................................................................................................................................

Soon the interest in his artwork had grown so huge that it was felt his work warranted a solo exhibition. Bizarrely the 1950s turned out to be difficult years for Portinari as his health deteriorated rapidly for unknown reasons after he returned from political exile in Uruguay. It was only after his death in 1962 that it emerged he had contracted lead-poisoning from the paints that he used.

..........................................................................................................................................

Cândido Portinari has a prolific body of work that is known around the world. They portray Brazilian social issues as well as images from his own life and depict the influences of surrealism and cubism, in addition to the artwork of Mexican muralists. Portinari was a unique artist with a unique talent borne of a unique people.

..........................................................................................................................................

Tell us what you think!

Tell us what you think!

0
    Login With Facebook   or:  
  • No comments found

Additional information

You are now being logged in using your Facebook credentials